Freund werden und Hirsana gewinnen
Hirsana

Recipes & Nutritional values

Recipes

Like other cereals, millet lends itself well to different ways of preparation. The special ZWICKY Golden Millet is made from hulled, polished millet which has its bitterness removed in a special process. The ZWICKY millet flakes are made from the cleaned and hulled millet. It is important to know that Zwicky millet flakes are stabilised with all their nutrients intact. The special process devised by Prof W Kollath allows the millet grains to be stored for longer periods of time without growing stale.

Recipes:
Millet and mascarpone dessert (pdf)
Golden millet patties (pdf)
Energy drink (pdf)

 

 

 

Nutritional values

Millet is probably the oldest crop cultivated by humans. It is thought that its origin is both in the Far East and Africa.

Millet is considered to be a valuable addition to a well-balanced diet. After carbohydrates, its main component, it also has 10% of protein. The biological value of the protein (i.e. a measure of the proportion of food protein absorbed and incorporated into the body’s own proteins) is comparable to that of rice and barley. As with other cereals, plant proteins from other sources (e.g. from beans and pulses) are recommended.

With a fat content of 4 %, millet is relatively high in fat for a cereal, only pipped by oats. Millet oil is three quarters unsaturated fatty acids and also has vitamin E and pro-vitamin A. It also has B vitamins such as B1 and niacin.

Valuable minerals
Its mineral and trace element content places millet in a superior class of its own. The little grains are not only replete of magnesium and potassium but iron too, indeed considerably more of it than any other cereal. Those suffering from an iron deficiency should include millet in their diet as much as possible. To ensure full absorption of the plant iron it is advisable to eat millet together with fruit or vegetables high in vitamin C.

Regional Laboratories, Frauenfeld, Switzerland

in %

protein 

fat 

carbohydrates  

water 

minerals 

fibre 

calories

Golden millet

10.5 

1.60 

74.2 

10.9 

2.44 

0.35 

367
407*

Millet meal

10.5 

1.97 

74.4 

11.04 

1.70 

0.36 

366
412*

Millet flour

9.2 

4.52 

71.8 

11.01 

2.87 

0.62 

373
421*

* for dry matter

The high mineral levels of millet show themselves most clearly when calculating the amounts of cereal necessary to take in the RDA of minerals. Of course from a dietary point of view this is a purely academic exercise as we don’t just eat cereals (40 – 80 kg of it for that matter). It is however the easiest way to show the natural advantages of millet:

A comparison with other cereals

 

RDA 

amount of cereal (in grams) to cover RDA

  

 

millet    

wheat flour (75%)

rice (polished)

Sodium 

1 - 2 g

2700 - 5400 g

40’000 – 80’000 g

7100 – 14’200 g

Potassium 

c. 2 g

700 g

1050 g 

3200 g

Calcium 

0.8 - 2 g 

5100 g  

3470 g 

10’000 g

Magnesium 

um 0.3 g

170 g 

 

1300 g

Phosphor  

1.2 g 

200 g 

545 g

666 g

Iron 

12 - 15 mg

54 - 68 g

666 - 833 g

400 – 500 g

Millet’s nutritional superiority is quite self-evident!

Silicic acid

Millet’s high level of silicic acid has been noted for many years. It is predominately present in the hull and stem. Silicic acid is a structural and supporting element.

Analysis by the Regional Chemical Laboratories, Canton Zurich, Switzerland

Raw millet

900 mg/100 g silicic acid

Millet meal

30 mg/100 g silicic acid



Analysis by the Regional Chemical Laboratories, Canton Thurgau, Switzerland

 

Silicic acid as SiO2

Wheat    

0.11 mg per 100 g

Rye    

0.06 mg per 100 g

Golden Millet

0.36 mg per 100 g

 

Therefore millet has three times more silicic acid than whole wheat.


HIRSANA